Culture and Commercialism

All Your Canadian Boxing Day Questions Answered

By |2018-10-11T14:54:31-05:00December 15th, 2017|Annual Monthly or Day Observance, Canada, Canadian Traditions, Cross-Cultural, Culture and Commercialism, Customer Service Etiquette, gift-giving, Global Celebrations, Global Etiquette, Global Traditions, Gracious Living, Holiday Season, International Holidays, International Travel Tips, Lifestyle, Modern Manners, Observances - Monthly & Daily|

The day after Christmas, December 26th, is an annual holiday known as “Boxing Day” celebrated in several countries in the British Commonwealth.

Art of Conversations in the Millennial Age

By |2018-10-11T14:54:32-05:00December 4th, 2017|Bridging the Cultural Divide, Business Etiquette, Career Tips, Cross-Cultural, Culture and Commercialism, Customer Service Etiquette, global competency, Interview Etiquette, Language and Culture, Lifestyle, Millennials, Modern Manners, Networking, Office Culture, Phone Etiquette and Protocol, University Students, Workplace Diversity, Workplace Etiquette|

To dispel this stereotype and strengthen millennial interpersonal skills, avoid these four modern communication mishaps.

Reconciling Dia de Los Muertos and Commercialism: Cultural Sensitivity

By |2018-10-11T14:54:38-05:00October 25th, 2017|Annual Monthly or Day Observance, Business Etiquette, Central America, Cross-Cultural, Culture, Culture and Commercialism, Global Celebrations, Global Traditions, Mexico, Social Etiquette|

If your business is partaking in Dia de Los Muertos this year, consider using these suggestions to give back to communities and to create a bridge between consumers, holidays, and products.

Diwali’s Dimming Consumerism

By |2018-10-11T14:54:39-05:00October 16th, 2017|Annual Monthly or Day Observance, Bridging the Cultural Divide, Cross-Cultural, Culture and Commercialism, Global Celebrations, global competency, Global Etiquette, Gracious Living, Intercultural, Religious Celebrations|

While Diwali may have marked a great start for businesses in previous years, a change in the Goods and Services Tax (GST) could mean a shift in celebrations.